What if peace comes with practice? That was the question that set Kay Wyma, author of The Peace Project: a 30-Day Experiment Practicing Thankfulness, Kindness, and Mercy, on a path to find the key elements that lead to peace. Kay shares the way she stumbled into the some counterintuitive truths for battling anxiety, and then she dives into the brain science (squeeee!). This fun episode will leave you with powerful, practical tips to practice yourself into peace.

(This page contains affiliate links. Your clicks and purchases help support Grit 'n' Grace at no extra charge to you.)

Recommended Resources

Your Turn

  • List three parts of your life that bring you anxiety, worry, stress and pressures.

  • Beside each one, list one aspect of that part of your life that makes you thankful. (We’re not asking you to step into denial. These are hard things, so feel free to list one tiny thing that brings thankfulness.)

  • What is the shift you feel when you focus on thankfulness?

Downloads

Featured Guest — Kay Wyma

Kay Wyma is a mom, blogger, vodcaster, and author of four books in which she has tackled, with candor and humor, some of the troubling societal issues that impact us all.

Kay’s writings have led her to appearances on TODAY, CNN, Hallmark’s Home & Family, and more. Before staying at home with her kids, she held positions at the White House and Bank of America. She lives in Dallas, Texas, with her husband and five kids.

You can connect with Kay at her website, via Instagram, and on Facebook!

Transcript — scroll to read here (or download above)

****

Grit ‘n’ Grace — The Podcast

Episode #236: How Thankfulness, Kindness, and Mercy Lead to Greater Peace

Note: This is an unedited, machine-generated transcript that is 70-80% accurate.

Cheri Gregory
So what if peace takes practice?

Amy Carroll
(Laughs) Well, that was the question that set Kay Wyma, author of The Peace Project on a path to find the key elements that lead to peace.

Cheri Gregory
Kay shares the way she stumbled into some counterintuitive truths for battling anxiety. And then she dives into the brain science.

Amy Carroll
Big squee! She’s one of our people. This fun episode will leave you with powerful practical tips to practice yourself into peace. Did you like all those Ps, Cheri?

Cheri Gregory
I loved it. I’m so impressed with all your alliteration. Pat yourself on the back.

Amy Carroll
Thank you.

Cheri Gregory
Well, this is Cheri Gregory –

Amy Carroll
– and I’m Amy Carroll –

Cheri Gregory
– and you’re listening to Grit’N’Grace: The Podcast that equips you to lose who you’re not, love who you are, and live your one life well.

Amy Carroll
Today we’re talking with Kay Wyma, author of The Peace Project: A 30 Day Experiment Practicing Thankfulness, Kindness, and Mercy. Kay is a mom, blogger, podcaster, and author of four books in which she has tackled with candor and humor some of the troubling societal issues that impact us all. Kay’s writings have led her to appearances on Today, CNN. Hallmark’s Home and Family, and more. Before staying at home with her kids, she held positions at the White House and Bank of America. She lives in Dallas, Texas with her husband and five kids.

Cheri Gregory
Does life have you feeling unsettled, overlooked, anxious and exhausted?

Amy Carroll
Good news, there’s a better way. Enter The Peace Project with short, digestible chapters full of practical application.

Cheri Gregory
This 30 day experiment invites you to experience lasting personal peace through the outward practices of thankfulness, kindness, and mercy in these hopeful pages.

Amy Carroll
Kay Willis Wyma takes us along on a journey to see others as well as ourselves not as objects or obstacles. But as people of great worth. People who matter

Cheri Gregory
The result? Transformation for you and those around you. Experiencing the endless depths of God’s peace where you can actually finally somehow breathe.

Amy Carroll
Welcome to the less than perfect, sometimes hilarious, consistently magical journey of practicing thankfulness, kindness, and mercy with Kay, her kids, and some bright friends.

Kay, we’re so excited to have you here with us.

Kay Willis Wyma
Thank you guys so much for having me! I think I’m excited one.

Amy Carroll
Well tell us what happened in your own life that prompted you to write The Peace Projet?

Kay Willis Wyma
Well, to be perfectly honest with you a rotten attitude, because you know –

(All laugh)

I was coming home from carpool, which is what I do. I have five kids, the oldest is 24. And the youngest is now 14. I’ve been driving carpool for 20 years.

Amy Carroll
Wow.

Kay Willis Wyma
So anyway, I was pulling into my driveway to go run to the store, I’d gone in and realized there wasn’t any milk in our refrigerator. There were two milk cartons, but there was no milk in the cartons.

(All laugh)

Kay Willis Wyma
Even last night, I just grabbed the cereal like laughingly going haha, I wonder if there’s no cereal in it, of course, no cereal in the boxes. So why, why. And so I was a tiny bit frustrated, I’m just saying. And I was actually going to go to the grocery store to get the milk for an event that was happening at my house, which usually does on Tuesdays where we study scripture together. So this was even a bad attitude before Bible studies. So I get in the car to go to the grocery store, and we live in an older neighborhood where our driveways are still on the side of our house. And I’m pulling out, there’s lots of cars on our streets there usually are, and a super nice work truck pulled over and was like bling blink! Go ahead. And I’m so happy. Like what a pleasure and a delightful day. And so I back into the street and this huge black pickup truck barrels on me and I’m kind of like, oh, hold on a second, like, what are you doing? And then, you know, this is my street, like, what in the world? And he gave me no choice and he was a lot bigger than I was. And I was forced to back down like literally three houses to even pull over to let him through.

And so as I did it, I looked up and I was met by this beautiful sunrise and without really thinking anything about it. I instantly went to ‘What am I doing?’ Like, I’m in a car, it’s air conditioned, I’m going to the grocery store, there’s refrigerated items, someone might say hello, Kay, you know, and without realizing it, gratitude had started washing over completely reframed my moment to where I was breathing. And looking up actually helps. Like you breathe when you look up, okay, and so now I’m genuinely, you know, letting the guy go because I’m sort of like go, it’s totally yours, you know, and I just pull back into my spot. And as he passes me, I have a moment going, I have no idea what is going on in his day. Like none. He could be racing to a meeting late, he could be running to the hospital. He could be a jerk, you know, for all I know, and a jerk lives a long life. And so I’m not trying to be over spiritual or anything. But I prayed for him. And I’m sort of like, instantly, man, I feel good. And I went into the grocery store. And I was like, wow, I feel really good. Like, I got my stuff. I chatted with the people, I get home, still feeling great when the ladies come over. And I told them, the weirdest thing happened this morning. And I told them my attitude and everything that went down. And I was going, it was an hour later. And I was like, I still like, physically feel great.

And so the next week, when they came back, one of the ladies said, can you share that story again? And I was like, what story? And the lady next to her goes, oh, I’ve been doing it. And I was like, doing what? She goes your thing. You know, the thing. She said, I’ve been trying to be thankful and like to purposely be kind and to have compassion. And I’m sitting there going, is that a thing? And I sort of was like, what if it is? Because I felt really great. What if this is something? Let’s try. And that’s how it started.

Amy Carroll
Wow, that is so cool. That God gave you a thing. And you didn’t even know it was your thing?

Kay Willis Wyma
No. And I wasn’t looking for a thing. And I kind of have a bad attitude about that, too.

Amy Carroll
You know what you sound like a sassy girl like Cheri and I, we like you. We like you.

Cheri Gregory
There are no words for how much I love that this all started with a bad attitude. Because there’s hope for me, ‘cause I start with that attitude.

Kay Willis Wyma
Ain’t that the truth, kicking and screaming. But anyway, I also love the fact that it physically felt so great. There was a part of me going what’s happening, like, what, what is going on? And when she said that, my wheels did start turning, and I kind of was sitting there going if this is a thing, let’s try. Why do these things make you feel better? What’s going on? It’s something inside of you. And around our parts, people diet, I’m just saying. And so the whole 30 is a really big thing around here. It has never been for me, because I don’t like to diet. And I don’t – and honestly, I had an eating disorder when I was younger. So I really don’t do stuff like that. But I know it really helps.

And I thought you know, the 30 days like, Whole 30 sounds great. And so I was like, why don’t we do a Soul 30 and like, proactively, like do something. And it’s not like a diet, it’s a feast, it’s sort of like, we’re not taking something away, we’re adding something major in. And if it does what it does, and you do that for 30 days, you’re going to actually impact your neural pathways. And that is so significant because we live in this world of anxiety and worry and stress and pressures. And all these things where when it’s going like this, our thoughts instantly go to the highest travel highways, the synapses in our brain. And it was sort of like what if we could replace that synapse with something that actually brings life?

And then of course, I’m sitting there going, I think that’s scriptural. Like, I think I’ve read that somewhere, transform your thoughts and make them obedient to me. And I mean, it was just sort of like crazy how scripture completely is married to science. Like it’s so – I mean, it gives me I have chills right now. I’m not joking you. It’s just insane. And it’s sort of like, wow, is this for real? And so there’s a part of me that is like, please, thank you so much for having me on your podcast. Just – I know part of it is because I wrote a book, forget the book, just do it. This is where life is.

And it’s what He said. They asked him what is the greatest commandment and He said, simply, love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, and mind. Which BTW is thankfulness, my eyes are not on myself, hello, you know, and then love others as yourself, which is not a narcissistic approach. It is caring for yourself because He loves you so much. And that is where life is. And I mean life, fullness, wholeness. And it was my daughter that named it The Peace Project. And I was like, you’re right. That’s exactly what it is.

And so thank you for letting me share because it’s not my message. I’m in it with everyone listening. And with y’all. We’re in it together. And I just don’t think we realize how much He loves us and how much abundance He has for us, even in the days that feel the least. It always has abundance of joy and peace because that’s what He’s about. He’s about us. He’s for us.

Cheri Gregory
So I love that you said your daughter named this The Peace Project. Exactly what’s involved? And I know you said it’s not really a project, it’s about living life. So I’m going to put “project” in quotation marks but spell it out for those of us who are kind of the how-to gals. What is involved?

Kay Willis Wyma
Okay, so there really is – and you know, it’s helpful to know what to do because we are told to do. And so the project is kind of like a game. I needed a game. It helps me to have a little something to, you know, have parameters around it because I’m kind of lazy and forgetful and flaky. And so I get distracted and forget. And so for 30 days, what we did, and I actually even got little notebooks for the kids and my friends that came on Tuesdays, they were like we’re in. So it really was my friends and my kids, and they’re part of this book. And it was to practice thankfulness, to practice kindness, an act of kindness, and to practice an act of mercy. So thankfulness is being thankful for something. And we made the rule around our house that it had to be different every day, it honestly does not matter, because with thankfulness and why there are so many thankful journals and things like that is because once you start, you really can’t stop. It’s almost like a flood. You start with – even like when that truck met me, and I was like, what the heck, and I sat there going, I’m in an air conditioned car. And it was like rolling, rolling, rolling more things. And instantly, I’m like, yes, that’s what thankfulness does. And it primes the pump for you to be able to genuinely be kind. And it’s a simple act of kindness.

And if you can do an altruistic kindness, it has even more power in your brain. Any act of kindness you do lights up portions of your brain, when you hit it altruistically, meaning that you get nothing in return, it lights up regions of your brain that cannot be lit in any other capacity. It’s the only thing that gets it going. And you can do it. It doesn’t matter what it is. At this morning, I just sent a text to somebody that was on my heart, I stopped for a moment and actually sent the text that I was thinking I’ve just encouraged her and listening to someone where you hear them is actually an act of kindness these days. And so doing that, and then mercy, practicing mercy, doing an act of mercy. And I’m just going to tell you, that is the hardest one. And it is so complicated and has so many nuances. There’s a Jesuit priest, I looked for the definitions, I was like why is it, what is it? Why is it something? How do you define it? And his definition, James Keenan was, is his name, is the willingness to enter into someone else’s chaos, which I found to be phenomenal. And willingness is the key because we can take mercy which involves compassion, grace, forgiveness, you know, just erring on the side of seeing someone as a human being.

And in Oxford, the definition is compassion or forgiveness for someone that could harm you. And that’s usually a part that’s involved with mercy. And so this isn’t about being a victim, if it’s a victim approach, stop. This is not about letting someone walk on you, or rolling over and just going, oh, do whatever you want. That is not what this is about. This is the willingness and the willingness only comes when your significance is settled, meaning that you are leaning into your identity and your worth as declared and determined by God. Okay. And it’s in that solid place, that we actually can genuinely look at somebody and treat them like a human being of worth. Yes. Like that guy in the truck. You know, he’s a human being. We are so lost on that today. The conversation in my car with my 13 year old this morning. He’s telling me how all about people being canceled. And I had a moment going, please tell me that’s not like in your world right now. And people being canceled. How is that a thing?

Amy Carroll
So you’ve described all of this project in your own life as an adventure. And you you have this journal. So tell us some stories of specific times that you am especially interested in this mercy when so give us some examples of what you did as an act of mercy. Okay, so

Kay Willis Wyma
Okay, so it’s almost like today, that’s where the adventure every day, it’s something new. If your eyes are open, get ready and enjoy, because there will be an opportunity for you to practice mercy pretty much every day, even with yourself. Okay, so here’s just a couple, one from this morning, I have to chat with some people at noon, went into my closet pulled out a really cute jacket that I swear fit. Like, I thought it fit and it didn’t. Like it’s very snug, you know, and I was sort of like, what in the world like what has happened to me, I feel like I look good, you know. And as I sat there ready to beat myself up in my thoughts, because I know, I know that’s not helpful. I know it’s helpful to recognize if something’s wrong and to eat right and be healthy, okay, but I know beating myself up brings me no life or peace. And so even in that moment, I was like, stop. We are off of a year of being in our house, of eating fast food. Yes, you might have partaken in every fry or chip that entered this house. And so maybe just stop, you know, but breathe, because in a couple of months, if you stop with the fries and chips, you may be back in that jacket. And if not, choose another, you know, so right then I’m instantly breathing again. That is mercy, compassion for myself, self care, stopping the mis-messaging and the bad narratives because that’s my bad narrative. Everybody has a narrative that’s not right. Every person. And so even in addressing my own, which I actually think is the hardest, I think it’s so hard for us to be kind to ourselves. And maybe it’s in doing that with others that it actually invites it for myself. And I could keep going.

Cheri Gregory
I love that example.

So how have you seen kindness change a life? You gave a great example here of kindness and self compassion in just a moment this morning. I love how practical that is. How have you seen kindness, acts of kindness change other people’s lives?

Kay Willis Wyma
Okay, so last week, I’m really not kidding. This could be every day. And I hope this one makes it in an article. I used it as you know, just as a pitch for somebody to pick up but I was walking in the parking lot in our grocery store. And you know, traffic has started again. And so people are unnerved, rightfully so, at driving in traffic, which we know how to do it, but because we haven’t done it in so long, it’s got us unsettled. And so I’m walking into the store. And this lady honks at me like, ah, and I jump, you know, and I’m sort of like, oh, I’m walking like, really? And then I sat there going, no, I know she’s got to be unnerved. Like to honk at someone in the parking lot that’s walking, more’s going on. So in that moment, I’m like, seeing her as a human. And I go into the store a little more whole than I would have been grumbling or like, can you believe, you know, that kind of stuff. So I make my way in, you know, to get meat in the deli line, and who shows up next to me, but the lady that honked at me and I did, really, and I’m seeing it going, I could, if I hadn’t caught it in that parking lot, I would have been grumbly at her, and just, you know, really not having nice thoughts in my head that I wasn’t there at all. And so the line was long at the deli that my number comes up and her being next to me, I feel her sigh and could hear her ugh. She had not gotten a number. And so she’d been standing there and had forgotten to get a number. And in that moment, I had margin in my day. I took my number. I gave it to her. She rejected it, okay, because we do, we’re like, no, no, I can’t do that. I hand it to the deli guy, the deli guy helps her. And so she, it’s like the skies are partying and angels are singing because something glorious happened right there at the deli. Okay, she was seen, she was heard, she had worth, I didn’t even – it was the deli guy entering into it. I mean, it was so unbelievable, and amazing. And that’s the kind of stuff. That is nothing! Like really, I just let her go ahead of me. You can do it in the turning lane and traffic light.

We did it the other day. And my daughter said, because she was like, let that person go ahead of us because they needed to get over a few lanes. They were confused. And so we did. And she said she turned to me, she’s 22, and she said, if someone did that for me, because she was like, I’m so glad we did that. And she said, if someone did that for me, you know what I would hear? You’re seen and I care for you. Enough said. It’s around us all the time, all day, every day. It’s free. And when you give, the one who gets is you. And that’s what it’s like, yes, it’s a project because I don’t know about y’all. But I do have to have a little stick or something. It’s helpful to get started on something. And so please try it. Try it ten days, try it five days, it doesn’t matter. Because you’re going to do it and feel great. I can tell you with absolute certainty, because it’s not my deal. The Lord saying do this, it sums up all the law and the prophets. Everything in the law, when He gave the law, He said, I’m not giving this to do something to you. I’m giving it for you. Because it makes you feel better. It makes you who you are, who I created you to be. And the freedom comes in to be able, maybe you know a little more each day to be a little more whole, just moment by moment. And will we do it on this side of heaven? I don’t know. But may it be more and more and more that we lean into this piece that is so available to us. That’s how much was given. So that we could have it because he loves you.

Amy Carroll
So good.

Cheri Gregory
What I love about what you’re sharing here is first of all, it is so nitty gritty, it – none of this is about grandstanding, or any you know great gestures. You know, I tend to be really good at the big gesture. I’m not so good on the every day. But also so much of this is about perspective. Taking off the blinders and putting yourself and assuming that the other person has a reason. We may not agree with it. Maybe we may not like it. We may not understand it but to assume the woman had a reason for honking at you. She had a reason for the attitude she was in and you could be gracious and merciful to her and improve her day and yours at the same time. I love how practical this is.

Kay Willis Wyma
It is. And the reason why the mercy piece is a challenge, and why it’s so important to do it with the little things in your life is because the ones that are big are really challenging. And the freedom that you can get from very deep issues and wounds, it’s significant. And some of that really may require help, like legitimate professional help. But this is an enormous help in the midst of that.

Amy Carroll
This is balm to our divided national soul, I will have to say, and not only that, but I love what you just said, Kay, which is we have to practice in the small things to be ready for the big things or to be able to tackle the big things that’s helpful.

So Kay, tell us what is the reflex that you talk about that comes with thankfulness, kindness, and mercy?

Kay Willis Wyma
Well, once you started it, and you continue to do it, it really does become like a reflex, like you’re not thinking about it, it instantly happens. I wasn’t in that grocery store parking lot going, Okay, now I need to do these things today. That said, when I started, I did with the kids. They did, one of my kids really has a hard time on the mercy part, Steven, towards himself. And so I stepped in, and for sure was pouring that on him so that those words may be spoken over him. And so as you do these things, it really becomes second nature. And I guess it and think it must have something to do with literally taking those neural pathways, showering him with things that are good when you think it it’s one thing when you act on it, it has even more of an impact. And that’s the part, the acting piece is the trust aspect. So I may believe that God loves me. But the truth is, we don’t, okay, I’m just saying that is to help me in my unbelief aspects because it’s such a challenge.

So even in my unbelief, what helps me with that is acting on it, even if I don’t believe it. And so in those actions, we’re actually making these ruts, a superhighway in our brain so that that’s where we go first. Or at least it’s easier to get to, I’m convinced, the more you do it, the more that will be where you go when the stress hits. Because when stress when change when uncertainty when chaos enters our sphere, which seems to be every day right now on the regular oh my gosh, and may has refused to give any respect to what we have lived through. I mean, it’s like I’m back, in spades, or be left behind. And so in that your brain could go to these places of fear, or anxiety or worry and how amazing to have it be pulled closer to these things that give you peace, in caring for yourself in caring for others and believing what God has spoken over you. This settled significance piece is so huge to actually believe what He speaks over you. You are loved, you are treasured, you are a masterpiece, your name is sought after, with a capital S and a capital A, you are safe, you are protected, you are provided for, you are never not seen. You are always chosen. And picking that up for myself. to be able to not only say it to the people that are walking alongside me who I really care about, and I like them tons, but to have it be coming out even when I’m not speaking. It’s so powerful. It’s so powerful.

And I think sometimes we put the burden on ourselves to do all this stuff. And it’s very hard to understand why he says not by strength, not by power, but by my Spirit says the Lord and yet that’s legit. It’s like when Moses came off that mountain, he was glowing, okay. And he was glowing because he had spent time in the presence of the goodness of the Lord. It was the goodness of God that passed before Moses who came down glowing. He had no clue. He wasn’t like glow. He was just radiating. And that’s what happens. Because it’s the peace from within. That is not our peace. When we tap into compassion. We aren’t compassion, He is. When we tap into forgiveness. We aren’t forgiveness, He is. Every time we do this, you’re literally experiencing him. I’m not sure that isn’t the whole thing.

Cheri Gregory
I think you may have synthesized it all right there.

So okay, every time we do an interview, our listeners submit some questions and you’ve already answered one of them beautifully. I’m going to go ahead and read it just because I want Erica to know that we heard her question and it was ‘How do you break the habit of being unkind, unmerciful to yourself?’ And you gave such a great example earlier, in terms of reaching for that jacket that that may not fit right now. And then a listener submitted this one – okay, it might have been me, ‘For those of us who wrestle with legalism and perfectionism, being critical and pointing out what’s wrong can feel intellectually superior and even more true than thankfulness, kindness and mercy.’ So how would you help someone like – well, I was gonna say, Amy, but I won’t throw her under the bus. You know, what would you say to someone like me who, I was raised to be skeptical and cynical, and that, it was, you know, our form of humor in our house is sarcasm. And none of that sounds like it meshes well with what you’re talking about, but I’m drawn to what you’re describing.

Kay Willis Wyma
Yeah, you know, I’m with you, we have a very similar hat. And I married into sarcasm, for sure. And I love my husband, and he’s brilliant. And with every gift that the Lord gives us, there’s a great part of it and a super challenging part of it. And so I would say that what you’re describing really is a lot of the gift of discernment, which is a hard gift to have, because you really genuinely see what’s wired in you is to be able to see the things that aren’t working that need improvement, because you’ve got the element of truth is very clear to you. And so the hard part in that is how to deliver it, you know, because it’s true. I’m really guessing, though, that you can sit on the other side and go, huh, I was right, because the Lord has revealed so much of that to you, because He created you that way. And so even leaning into that, I didn’t make this up, you created it, You put it in me. And so please help me to be able to live fully in it.

And yet care and be compassionate for the people that you have revealed this to me to be able to walk alongside them. Man, if He gave you that gift, you’ve got the capacity to do the other because he doesn’t give in a lacking sense. He never sets us up ever, we get lost and set ourselves up. But he doesn’t do that. And so to be able to lean into that into these situations, You have shown me this, please give me the words to be able to either hold my tongue and walk alongside or to be able to communicate it when there’s a place where I can do it absolutely 1,000% lovingly instead of through sarcasm, which is a really effective tool, the only problem with it is that it hurts. It’s super effective, but it doesn’t bring life, it usually brings a little bit of death with it, but it works. Okay. And so it’s sort of like when the sarcasm pops, ask for the gut check. Because the crazy part is those things we do them to ourselves. Like we’re sarcastic with ourselves. And so it’s sort of like the freedom that is laced in this is the freedom and the truth. And the truth is you have a phenomenal gifting.

And where would we be without it? Like, if I hadn’t married a sarcastic truth teller, oh my gosh, like the businesses, I’ve started that I’ve been Pollyanna thinking that 1000 million people are going to buy it or I mean, I will be the biggest mess. Because I need that check next to me, it keeps me grounded. And it’s probably why we were attracted to each other because he needs the one that’s light hearted going, oh, the world is your oyster, you can do anything, you know, because you can. So that’s why I sit there. And I would say the same thing for the person with the gift of hospitality with the person that has the gift of compassion, because you’re seeing things that are woven within you to see because you are gifted in purpose to do just that, which is absolutely a part of your father in you.

Amy Carroll
Okay, what closing words do you have to motivate our friends who want to intentionally practice more thankfulness, kindness and mercy?

Kay Willis Wyma
JDI. Just do it. Okay, so that’s just do it. Don’t you love putting a letter on things?

Amy Carroll
I do love it. But I can hear your kids eyes rolling right now. Yes.

Kay Willis Wyma
You know, I’m now cringy. Now I’m like, oh, I like that word cringy. And the kids are going ‘Why did I say that?’

Amy Carroll
I’m your mom, I live to be cringy!

Kay Willis Wyma
What are we gonna do without them? I guess I’ll just be cringy in the car by myself. So I’m really not kidding. Just do it. Just do it. Do it. And I will say this, write it down, please. For the next 30 days. There were some gals that did it with me that were like, Is there an app? Like could you make an app? Hilarious. I am crazy with – I’m like, oh, did someone say make an app? Surely there’s a way to do that. So I really did make an app for it. So that – and I’ll send you all the link. It’s actually, it’s a web progressive app, which means it’s on the internet and it’s sort of like Spotify. It’s one of those and so it’s peaceprojectsoul30.com so that you have a place to journal because you’re gonna want to remember and you’re going to think that you will, but you’ll forget and oh my gosh, it’s so fun to go back and look and it may start out sputtering. Who cares? This isn’t like a to-do task and you’re okay if you did it and you’re not if you’re not. because another thing about the Lord’s economy – the world likes to say ‘A plus b equals c. If you do this then you’re okay.’ Major if-then statements. God’s is a because-then. Because You are loved, be free. Because I see you, be known. And function out of His because-then so that we can walk and fullness and wholeness that he gives you and to write it down is super fun. And I’m really unorganized and flaky. And let me remind everybody, y’all, I’m setting the bar low over here really low. So you can do it. I promise you

Cheri Gregory
Just do it. Now I’ll be honest, Amy, under normal circumstances, that phrase would make me want to poke my eyes out.

Amy Carroll
And you know I love it more than life!

Cheri Gregory
But –

Amy Carroll
We’re brain science geeks. So we love Kay Wyma.

Cheri Gregory
And we know that it works. Although I will say oh my goodness, thankfulness, kindness and mercy?

Amy Carroll
The mercy part blew my doors off.

Cheri Gregory
Well friends, we sure hope you’ve enjoyed listening to episode number 236 of Grit’N’Grace: The Podcast as much as we’ve enjoyed making it for you.

Amy Carroll
And we want to say a big thank you to Kay Wyma, author of The Peace Project: A 30 Day Experiment Practicing Thankfulness, Kindness, and Mercy and her publisher Ravel.

Cheri Gregory
Check out our web page at gritngracethepodcast.com/episode236.

Amy Carroll
There you’ll find this week’s transcript, a link to order The Peace Project: A 30 Day Experiment Practicing Thankfulness, Kindness, and Mercy, and a link to Kay’s website, which has some great resources related to her books.

Cheri Gregory
If you’ve enjoyed this episode of Grit’N’Grace, would you consider leaving us a review? You’ll find a super simple video showing you how at gritngracethepodcast.com/review.

Amy Carroll
Next week we’ll be talking with Jodie Niznik, author of Crossroads: A study of Esther and Jonah for Boldly Responding to Your Call.

Cheri Gregory
For today, grow Your grit,

Amy Carroll
embrace God’s grace,

Cheri Gregory
and as God reveals the next step to live your one life well,

Amy Carroll
we’ll be cheering you on! So –

Both
– take it!

You’ll never miss an episode when you sign up for weekly updates!

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

You have to agree to the comment policy.